Street Life in Sicily

Life in Italy, Italywise

Street life in Cefalu, Sicily is rich in vignettes.

I feel like a paparazzo (that’s just one photographer vs paparazzi, which indicates many) of street life in Italy. I do this not only for photography, but for inspiration for my paintings. I try to work in stealth (that translates into having a zoom lens), so as not to disturb the energy of the scenes that unfold before my eyes.

So it was on this day in Cefalu, Sicily, that I begin zigzagging through the streets with my periscope up on the lookout to see what presented itself. Much of the movie Cinema Paradiso was filmed Cefalu. I can see why this was a perfect movie set, and still is.

The translation of Cefalu is “head”, and theories suggest this refers to the shape of the hill and rock above the town, adorned with an ancient castle.

Learn more about Cefalu at ItalyGuides.it.

In this particular image, the gentlemen in the chair was fixed, as if rendered in stone. Meanwhile la suora (the sister) moves up the street, and enters a home. I love these layers of street life in Sicily, and I hope to return for a longer visit, solely to for the purpose of capturing life as it unfolds on the streets of Sicily.

For this and other photographs, please be sure to check out my online gallery.

Emerging from the Pantheon at Dusk

Pantheon, Italywise

Looking out from the Pantheon entrance at dusk.

The Pantheon is my favorite landmark in Rome. The sense of awe I feel when I round the corner and see this massive feat of architectural splendor never gets old. I remember the first time I entered the building when I was a mere 19 years old and studying art in Italy for a summer with the University of Georgia. My jaw dropped and I was struck speechless, marvelling that something this huge and this beautiful could have been built nearly 2,000 years ago.

Almost two thousand years after it was built, the Pantheon’s dome is still the world’s largest unreinforced concrete dome. – Wikepdia

Until recently, almost all of my photos of the Pantheon have been taken looking towards the facade or inside the voluminous interior. On this chilly January day last year I was struck by the view looking out. I love the contrast of the stately columns against the always-hopping Piazza della Rotonda.

This photo reminds me to keep changing my perspective on the world and to always “play” and mix things up. It’s far too easy to get locked into a more standard view of the world, and go for the “expected” angle.

If you like this image, please be sure to check out my online photo gallery.

Saying “I do” in Italy.

Last October, I was honored to be the wedding photographer for the marriage of the daughter of some very dear friends from North Carolina. I had an amazing time being in “artist mode”, constantly on the move to capture key moments (often furtively). I also felt incredibly privileged to be included in a ceremony and celebration of love between two radiant, loving souls. The wedding itself was an intimate affair with maybe two dozen people – mostly family and close friends who had made the journey from the States to be part of this important event.

The wedding ceremony and the reception and dinner afterwards was held at my favorite restaurant and agriturismo, Calagrana, here in Umbria, in the Niccone Valley. They are masters at orchestrating events and delivering some of the most amazing wines and foods you’ll find in Umbria. The bride and groom were married under a verdant gazebo with graceful wrought-iron swirls. The bride’s father, a minister, officiated.

After the ceremony, prosecco and appetizers were served on the terrace overlooking the valley. A long sit-down dinner came next. Nothing was hurried or orchestrated on a strict time schedule. For me, it was almost as if Italy’s “Slow Food” movement had extended to the wedding venue.

As the photographer, I loved witnessing the many wonderful emotions flowing through the course of the afternoon and evening. At times I felt guilty – like I was some kind of voyeur or intruder into very personal and intimate moments. One of my favorite images is of the embrace between the new husband and wife when they slipped out on the terrace to have a moment alone.

I have attended two other weddings here in Umbria. Both were Italian weddings and they were much larger affairs (hundreds of guests). I’ll write about them in another posts. But, whether it is a wedding of Americans or of Italians, tying the knot in Italy is a magical experience.

 

In the Moment – Photo by Jed

In the Moment

In the Moment

This is one of my favorite photographs – for more personal reasons, which are inherent in the title. I have lived a very full life, yet sometimes the dark side of fullness is a cacophony of too much thinking and doing. Too much time in my head analyzing and labeling things, and too much time preoccupied with the future. Some philosophers have called it “intellectual violence”.

When I look back at this photo I’m reminded to “Be here now.” This photo was taken near the lovely Abbazia di Sant’Antimo, south of Montalcino (think spectacular Brunello wines) in Tuscany. I come across reflective moments like this in many rural Italian areas. In Umbria, I often see my neighbor, a woman in her 70’s, sitting out on her top step with her walking cane leaning against her, while she gazes, seemingly for hours, across her fields of vegetables to the spectacular mountain vista that surrounds all of us. Some people might look at the lives of such “salt of the earth” people and think they have boring repetitive lives. Maybe there is spaciousness and freedom in such lives that aren’t filled with non-stop “doing” or over-crowded by a world of constant digital connectedness. I suspect many of these people are more alive than we can imagine.

I pray to live a life outside of my head, and to reside more in my heart. I pray to experience truly what is right in front of me, right now.

To see this and other photographs and paintings be sure to visit my online gallery.

Cellulari – Photo by Jed

"Cellulari" - Mobile phones in a story of movement here in central Rome.

“Cellulari” – Mobile phones in a story of movement here in central Rome.

 

I love capturing people as they go about their daily lives here in central Rome. At times, I resist inclusion of elements that demonstrate how the digital world is taking over people’s lives (no, I’m not immune), preferring to capture the old world charm of this city whenever possible. But, I believe art and photography moves with the evolution of societies. It makes me wonder where and how mobile phones will be viewed by future generations, and if technology will have advanced in such a way that these phones depicted here, will be perceived as old and clunky as rotary dial phones. Will the use of these devices be perceived as something that became nostalgic and romantic?

Pondering these questions, I was very happy to capture this pedestrian scene, which almost feels orchestrated in the movements of the characters. The older woman, stylishly put together (and her dog, too) clearly is engrossed with the contents of her phone, and she has the agility to do this “one-handed”, which shows she’s not a novice. Off to the right a father with stroller makes his entrance, also with the same focus and involvement with the cellphone in hand.

See this and other photos and painting in the online gallery.

 

“The Daily News” – Photo by Jed

Lettura del quotidiano

Lettura del quotidaino – Reading the daily news. A common scene in bars here in Italy.

This black and white photo captures a scene I enjoy observing every day in cafès here in Italy. Each cafe has several newspapers, so unless someone else is already reading your favorite newspaper, reading is pretty much a fee endeavor. I love seeing the concentration and involvement with these publications, which are ripe with the crazy politics and scandals of Italy and Europe. And, you’ll also find ample commentary on all that is newsworthy in the States. While Italy, and Europe is a bit of governmental and financial mess these days, people also find much of what is going on “across the Atlantic” to be a mess of its own.

Be sure to check out other black and white photos in the online gallery.

“The Card Game” – Photography by Jed

The Card Game

Just head to almost any piazza across Italy mid-day to late afternoon, and you’re likely to find a group of “the boys” immersed in a serious card game.

I want to share with you one of my favorite photos that I captured in the beautiful Umbrian hill village of Montone. I love seeing the engagement and intensity in these gatherings of locals. I will never be at a lack for such compelling vignettes of daily life here in Italy. Check out this and other black and white photos in my online gallery.

“Milking Time” – Photo by Jed

Percore Milking Time

Tre fratelli sardi al lavoro, which means “three Sardinian brothers at work”. I enjoyed capturing this photo because daily pecore (sheeps) milking time is such an art. And these brothers, who relocated from Sardinia many years ago, have built a thriving business in the Maremma. Their percorino has celebrity status among locals. The day we were there, they were making their ricotta. Word was already out on the street, and we could hear and see many cars hastening along the dirt roads leading to the main facility, where the drivers would wait patiently for the readiness of this culinary treat. Milking time was a priceless photo opp. I love this rural “production line” of milking the sheep, and I love that the focus of this particular composition is about the sheep. So much personality…and the animals seem to be well treated, which I always like to see.

Be sure to check out other of my black and white photos in the online gallery.

The Magnificence of the Colosseum – Photo by Jed

Always awe-inspiriting, the Roman Colosseum has a history rooted in spectacle and great cruelty.

Always awe-inspiriting, the Roman Colosseum has a history rooted in spectacle and great cruelty.

Rome’s Colosseum (Wikipedia link) never ceases to inspire me, while also causing me to reflect on the infamous spectacles that were housed in such a marvel of architectural accomplishment. Over time, I plan to do a series of the Colosseum with my photography – with different angles, different lightling. For me it will be a challenge of altering my perspective and seeing what presents itself. Check out this an other photography and paintings in my online gallery.

 

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