Applying for an Italian Elective Residency Visa?

Italian Elective Residency Visa

For most people, getting the Italian Elective Residency Visa is the most stress-producing part of the process of moving to Italy.

Lately I’ve been receiving numerous inquiries about getting a visa for a long stay in Italy. This includes student visas, family reunification visas, and work visas. But, overwhelmingly I’m queried most about the Italian Elective Residence Visa, and my experiences navigating the process.

if you’re like me, you’ve scoured the internet for rock solid clarity of what exactly is required, yet you’ve found the information either incomplete or confusing. Everyone’s circumstances are different, but hopefully I can shed some light on the process, and help lessen the stress.

Not all Italian consulates are created equal

Wouldn’t it be nice to know that the Italian consulates scattered across the States are¬†ticked and tied, and religiously follow the same procedures? From the numerous stories I’ve heard first hand, and from research online, it’s evident that each consulate has a different “personality”. Some are known to be friendlier

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Tips for Getting Your Italian Visa

Italian Visa

With my Italian Visa successfully in hand, I had the official “green light” to begin my journey as an expat.

This is the crucial step in either moving to Italy for good, or for going for an extended stay. But, you won’t be going anywhere in Italy for such an extended stay if you don’t procure your Italian Visa.

I obsessed about this, and I spent countless hours online combing though information trying to find out EXACTLY what I would need to guarantee success. Some information was pretty black and white, and other information about requirements and the approval process was discouragingly “grey”.

Firstly, you need to determine which type of visa for which you want to apply. Student visas are fairly easy, as long as you have plenty of documentation regarding your place and course of study, your length of stay, and documentation of your place to live. Work visas are pretty hard to get, unless you are being sponsored by an Italian company or a U.S. company doing business in Italy. Again, lots of documentation. Remember, the economy in Italy has been pretty dicey for the past several years, and jobs aren’t in abundant supply. As you might imagine, the Italian government wants to do its best to prevent foreign interlopers from snatching jobs away from Italian citizens. Understandable.

Then there is the elective residency visa, which basically states you are coming to Italy NOT to work, and that you have sufficient financial resources to live without becoming a burden on the country. This is the grayest of all requirements, because there is no published criteria for the threshold of required financial assets, and those requirements seem to be much higher when applying for your Italian residency visa, than applying for your permesso di soggiorno (stay permit) that takes over from the visa once you have settled in Italy.

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