Meet Manu – the Best Online Italian Teacher You’ll Find!

ItalyMadeEasy.com

Meet Manu of ItalyMadeEasy.com

For several months now I’ve been following the wonderful resources of ItalyMadeEasy.com. Manu, the founder and online Italian teacher is, by far, the best, and most engaging Italian language instructor that I’ve come across. A primary goal of ItalyWise.com has been to point people to be best information and resources to assist them in making the transition to living in Italy. I’d like to think of myself as someone who helps curate the best of the best when it comes to all things Italian.

Why do I love Manu’s style of teaching? Primarily for the following two reasons (though there are many more):

Manu is a native speaker.

While Manu has an excellent command of English, his first (and native) language is Italian. I strongly believe that this is essential to REALLY learning and understanding the many subtleties of speaking Italian. This will make you more successful in becoming part of the Italian culture.

He’s fun and engaging. This man LOVES teaching Italian.

I am the son of a gifted art teacher. My mom was widely recognized for her ability to ignite a love of art in her students. Manu, in my opinion, is equally gifted. You will never be bored under his tutelage.

Meet Manu in a series of YouTube videos specially done for ItalyWise.com

Manu and I are like-minded in emphasizing the importance of speaking Italian for anyone who wants to move to Italy. And, we’re not just talking about basic greetings and saying thank you.

This man has so much knowledge to share that I’ve decided to devote a series of upcoming posts to these videos. Six interview questions will help you understand why he is the best online Italian teacher on the planet! Manu will tell you a little about himself, and introduce the six interview questions that will be featured in the upcoming posts.

Be sure to take advantage of all the resources Manu has to offer for learning Italian!

Read More

The Ins and Outs of Italian Residency

Italian residency, ItalyWise

The carta di identitá.

Okay, I’m letting you know up front that this isn’t going to be a glamorous or creative post. But, it IS highly practical, so if you’re serious about living in Italy for more than ninety (90) days, you’d better be prepared to address what is involved in getting your Italian residency permit, and your Italian residency card.

Permits for Italian residency – The Permesso di Soggiorno.

People who’ve come to Italy with the visa allowing a year’s stay (for an elective residency visa), are required, for stays over ninety (90) days, to make application for a permit to stay, or a permesso di soggiorno (read my post about it here). The process is pretty straightforward, and already you’ll have pulled much of the required documentation for the process of getting your Italian visa (read my post about the visa process, but check with your Italian consulate for the latest checklist).

Depending on where you live in Italy, the residency permit processing times are vastly different. In Perugia, permesso di soggiorno elective residency permits have been taking up to six months. Other places turn around the permits in just weeks. So, research what to expect in your area and plan accordingly.

Read more about residency permits requirements (including renewal guidelines) here from the Polizia di Stato.

Getting your Carta di Identitá – Your Italian Residency Card

Read More

Tanti Auguri for a Spectacular 2017

Auguri, Italywise

If you plan on moving to Italy, or spending a fair amount of time here, be prepared to make “auguri”, in its many uses and forms, an integral part of your vocabulary. “Auguri” comes from the verb “augurare”, which means “to wish”. Here in Italy the word is used with great enthusiasm and frequency. And, for English speakers, thankfully it’s one of those Italian words that rolls off the tongue quite easily. You can master it quickly.

Here’s a quick guide to a few uses for birthdays, new births, anniversaries, christenings, holidays, engagements, weddings, new jobs, graduations, etc.):

“Auguri” – “Best wishes.”

“Tanti auguri” – “Many well wishes.”

If you want to be be a little more formal, or specific, you could say something like:

Read More

May the Stars of Possibility Light Your Way

Stars in Treviso, Italywise

My extraordinary artistic mother lit the fuse of my imagination.

My brilliant engineering father taught me how to construct a plan and a path towards making something happen.

I am indeed fortunate that such beautifully intertwined influences (and gene pools) came together to create this being called Jed Smith (and my two enormously talented sisters). Though Liz and Ed already have taken flight from this earthly realm, they remain the two brightest stars illuminating my path and the journey towards an endless world of possibility.

Last evening, a stroll through the magically lit streets and alleyways of Treviso prompted this realization. I was overcome with gratitude, and my subsequent meanderings through the city left me contemplating the following questions:

Just who and what are the numerous stars that illuminate your path?

Read More

Valdobbiadene Will Deepen Your Love Affair with Prosecco

Prosecco, Valdobbiadene, ItalyWise

Prosecco wines of Valdobbiadene

It seems only fitting, with the holiday season, to devote a post to the standard-bearer of celebratory wines here in Italy – Prosecco. Until recently, I had been sloppy about my Prosecco knowledge. That is, until my partner and I took the forty-five minute drive from Treviso to Valdobbiadene. This town and area, my friends, is THE bullseye when it come to the gold standard for prosecco.

Prosecco continues to become all the rage outside of Italy.  But beware of what you’re buying!

I’ve been one of those people – you know, who gets excited just hearing the word prosecco, without really understanding the vast differences between what is being marketed as prosecco. I’ve learned there are plenty of differences, and a lot of the prosecco being exported is appealing to the general idea of prosecco, and not to the elegant subtleties. The good news is that most people really enjoy the prosecco they are buying at the local grocery or wine shop. But, come to Italy and spend a day in Valdobiaddene, and you might realize you’ve been short-changing yourself.

A day of tastings in Valdobiaddene will help you zero in on the style you like best.

Read More

Coming to live in Italy? Get used to the marca da bollo

marca da bollo, Italywise

Get used to buying a marca da bolla when you navigate the Italian bureaucracy

This post isn’t glamorous or riveting – that is, unless you find the nuts and bolts of the bureaucratic process fascinating. But, the marca da bollo, or Italian revenue stamp, is a regular necessity in Italian life – especially if you’re a new resident making applications for various things.

The marca da bolla has been in use since 1863

I’ve been asking myself what practical matters have I left unaddressed on my blog. Well, this past week I was reminded of that pesky little thing called the marca da bollo. I had gone to the U.S. consulate to get a particular declaration needed for one a process I’m going through here in Treviso. Even though the document carried the official stamp of the consulate and the officer assured me the city of Treviso had the signature on file, the comune office informed me I needed to go to yet another office in order for them to certify that the consulate certificate was valid. As we entered the office it occurred to me that I might need a marca da bollo to get this certification. Bingo. Eighteen euro, I was told, and we hopped in the car to find the closed tabaccheria (about a five-minute drive). If you don’t what a tabaccheria is, in addition to a marca da bollo, you can buy regular stamps, lottery tickets, bus tickets, cigarettes, stationary, etc.

Read More

Embrace the mystery of life, and prepare for things to change…

Mystery of life, Italywise

Contrary to a life-long desire to figure “things” out, and arrive at a metaphorical destination in which I finally can relax, I’m learning that constant seeking…a constant insistence on being able to explain things, instead keeps me stuck and limited. These days I keep finding myself being invited to embrace the mystery of life, and to trust that, when I do, life will carry me along to unforeseen, and unimagined places of creativity and possibility.

And, I’m reminded that I don’t know squat. Most of the time, that’s actually is a huge relief, and I feel something inside of me let go, and relax. My, what a price we pay for being on high alert while simultaneously trying to lasso life and manage it to our liking.

Might life have better plans for us than even our most lofty ideas? I believe so.

This is the scariest part for me – actually to keep moving forward while trusting in the mystery of life. Moving to Italy and throwing myself headlong into all my creative passions (writing, painting, photography) feels like a huge roll of the dice. My inner judge tells me I’m being indulgent and irresponsible. It then tells me “Well, if you insist on this path, step aside and let me manage the process.” Yikes. Talk about a creativity killer.

Read More

Che bordello! – A favorite Italian expression.

Italian Expressions, Italywise

A frequently used Italian expression to communicate a mess of a situation!

One of the things I love most about learning and speaking Italian is stumbling across a phrase or expression utilizing a metaphor that perfectly captures the sentiment a person wishes to convey. “Che bordello!” is an Italian expression that rises to the top of my list of favorites.

“Che bordello!” translates literally into “What a brothel/whorehouse!” but also means “What a mess!”

As you can see, this expression doesn’t work in the English translation. If you said “What a brothel!” in the U.S. people would look at you like you’d lost your mind. Surely you’d offend someone. You might even get slapped.

“E un bordello,” or “It’s a mess,” is a more toned down commentary of a situation that is a bit out of hand.

I had heard the word “bordello” being frequently used, and finally I had the courage to ask someone why he kept talking about a brothel. The explanation came with a smile. As I soon learned, this Italian expression is considered to be one of the best for communicating confusion or a mess of a situation. I hadn’t thought of a brothel as inherently unorganized, but I guess you could say that there’s a lot of different activity going on simultaneously in a whorehouse. And, that prompts me to laugh.

This expression comes in quite handy, and I’m putting it to good use. And, when I do, Italians nod in agreement.

To headline this post, I searched for an image that might visually represent this phrase. And, the one above, during the high waters in Venice, won the contest, hands down. Believe me “Che bordello!” is used frequently when the sirens go off in Venice indicating high waters. We have a very good friend who owns two shops in Venice, and when the high waters come, she must rush to her stores to move all of her merchandise off the floors to a level of safety. Shop owners also have dams for their doors to minimize the water, though often the water seeps in from below.

And, of course, there is the matter of getting around Venice during high waters. Even in February, when this photo was taken, Venice is full of tourists and their suitcases. What a messy situation!

Oh, the applications can be plentiful, and I look forward to using “Che bordello!” with great frequency!

I’d love for you to become a direct subscriber to Italywise.com. It’s easy. Just enter your email in the upper right column. You’ll receive a confirmation email, and then future blog posts will land directly in your in-box!

My Buddy, the Bidet

The Bidet, Italywise

Here in Italy the bidet is indispensable when it comes to person hygiene.

Well, I promised myself I would be faithful to discussing all facets of my new life here in Italy. And, to that promise, today I’m writing lovingly about my buddy, the bidet. Pardon me if I insert a bit of bathroom humor, but I’ll try to keep it clean as possible (the puns already are starting!).

The bidet is found most widely in southern Europe, with Italy topping the list.

Wikipedia will ground you in the basics of the bidet, if for some reason, you need an education. I saw my first bidet many moons ago when I was studying art here in Italy. My university group had landed in Paris, and we were staying there for a couple of nights before taking the train to Florence. In our little hotel I remember my moment of extreme bewilderment when I saw this hybrid of a sink and a toilet. I stood there, wondering if there was a hidden camera recording my confusion, and my eventual choice as to which device to use. Mom and dad hadn’t prepared me for this. I chose wisely, opting to go with the known entity. I asked questions later, but basically got an explanation that it was for women to “freshen up” after using the toilet.

Now I understand so much more. And, I don’t know what I would do without one in our home.

Italians take their personal hygiene and their bathroom habits seriously. I’ve heard many of my Italian friends remark, with disbelief, that a bidet isn’t a common bathroom fixture in the United States, even going so far as to say “Che schifo!”, or “How disgusting!”. This is followed up with an inquiry as to how Americans make sure they’re “clean” after going to the toilet, and remarking that toilet paper surely can’t do a complete job.

I have to agree.

I now understand that the bidet is designed for both genders. The hurdle for me was getting past the sitting on cold porcelain. Yikes, that’s an abrupt feeling of cold. Now I know what women feel like when the men in their households leave the toilet seat up, and they experience surprise contact with porcelain.

But, now I’m well versed in how to use the bidet. A person can sit facing the faucet or opposite, depending on the task at hand, or personal preference. Soaps for “intimate” areas are always within reach.

What happens when space doesn’t allow for a bidet?

An important question, especially since some bathrooms simply aren’t large enough to accommodate a bidet. If you’ve ever been to Italy, and seen a faucet with a hose next to the toilet, well that’s what it’s for – not to hose down the floor or clean the bath, though it certainly can come in handy in that regard. The problem, for me, with this “solve”, is the inability to control and contain the water during the hose-down of private parts. And, the force of the water often is a bit much for my taste. But, now that my “house training” has adapted me to the benefits of the bidet, I’ll certainly take the hose over not having anything but toilet paper.

Now, when I’m out and about, and a bidet or a special hygiene hose doesn’t exist (as is the case in many restaurants and bar/cafès) I’m not a happy camper. And, when I visit the States, I have to revert to old habits, and settle for not having the extra dose of “clean up”. Certainly not the end of the world, but now that I’ve seen the light, I’m a convert.

Yes, I’m spoiled, but I’m happy not to be soiled (sorry, couldn’t resist it).

I hope you enjoyed this brief post extolling the wonders of the bidet!

 

The Art of Italian Exclamation

Italian exclamation, Italywise

An exclamation of beauty.

Learning Italian can be daunting, especially if you insist on understanding and mastering the grammar. However, learning a few basics can take you far. Essentials are greetings, learning how to politely ask for something, and graciously thanking someone. If you desire to express your enthusiasm for the experiences you’ll have in Italy, which will be plentiful, then you might want to add a few simple phrases in your speaking arsenal.

A spontaneous expression easily can be constructed using the following formula:

Che + adjective (which must agree with the gender to which it is referring)!

Che, pronounced like “kay” (the ch makes a hard k) is the equivalent of saying “How”.

Che bella! – How beautiful!

Because, in the photo above, this refers to the vista, or the city, which is città, and both are feminine, this is why you say bella and not bello. Of course, if you see a handsome man, you might say “Che bello!” I use this expression most often when greeting friendly dogs on the street (once I know their gender).

Che buono! – How good!

This is a great expression to show your satisfaction with a meal. (In this instance buono refers to the food in general, which is cibo. If you were talking about a steak, a bistecca, it would be “Che buona!”).

While this is an exclamation of delight with your food, many westerners make the mistake of trying to be overly effusive. Don’t be over the top and say it’s the best you’ve every had, or that it is fantastic or spectacular. “Che buono!” will communicate your pleasure quite effectively.

Che caldo! – How hot!

When you’re trekking through Italy in the thick of summer, you’ll find yourself saying this fairly frequently. The converse is, “Che freddo!” or “How cold!”

Che brutto! – How ugly (or bad)!

If you’ve seen an especially ugly piece of art or architecture, this works (though it probably is best to say this quietly, or keep it to yourself, so as not to offend). Also, this can refer to someone who has behaved badly (again, practice caution, and not say this directly to someone so as not to escalate a situation).

Finally, my favorite…

Che schifo! – How disgusting!

Just a few days ago this came in handy. I was sweating away on the treadmill at our gym, when a guy hopped on the one next to me. As he started up, he pointed at a discarded wad of gum the previous person had stuck on the control panel, making a face of disbelief. I looked over, and exclaimed “Che schifo!”, to which he rolled his eyes and nodded in agreement.

The list goes on, but I advise focusing on using just a few. Once you have a better command of speaking Italian, and once you understand which adjectives work naturally with this formula, you can go to town.

And in closing, an important cautionary note – don’t exaggerate!

Americans in particular have seen too many movies with Italian themes, and when speaking Italian they often are “over the top” in volume and in exaggeration. Hollywood, is mostly the culprit, frequently having made caricatures of Italians and how they speak. Practice proper pronunciation, but speak evenly and politely, and you’ll be in fine shape.

 

 

 

 

 

Page 2 of 912345...Last »