What is Your View of the World?

 

Venice, Italywise

A window in the Giudecca looks out on Venice in this new photo by Jed Smith.

 

I’ve been asking myself this question anew lately. Recently I was fully entranced watching the new television show Master of Photography with host Isabella Rossellini. Think Project Runway, but with a group of twelve amateur and professional photographers vying to make it to the next level after each photo assignment – one that is viewed, critiqued, and juried by world-renowned photographers. The episode (and assignment) was “The Beauty of Rome” and the participants were given a four-hour window to scour Rome for their unique take on it as the Eternal City.

I tried to imagine myself under the duress of this kind of assignment, and I started getting nervous watching the contestants hard at work. But, mostly I was excited and eager to see Rome through twelve different sets of eyes.

I sweated when the contestants made their final choices and submitted them for the critique and a subsequent elimination of one within their ranks. And, for good reason. The jury of famous photographers didn’t hold anything back, offering encouragement in the right moments, but mostly chiding them for playing to the judges and not delivering on the assignment that asked for a truly personal vision and statement.

I also remember a moment when one judge urged a contestant to not explain too much about her piece so as to not unduly influence the viewers and to allow them to bring their own interpretations to the experience. I loved that, because I needed to be reminded of the following:

Don’t let your creative expression become too cerebral. You can think all the emotion OUT of your expression, if you’re not careful. And, by all means, keep your mouth shut and let people find meaning in your work without your having to spell it out for them.

I’m at an important crossroads in my artistic endeavors, and I’m realizing that, all too often, my head goes to the place of asking the question, “Will this be a successful piece, and will people like it?” – rather than letting my heart and intuition guide me to what feels right for me personally. I believe my most successful paintings and photographs are ones in which I feel my way through their creation.

An additional piece of advice I’ve been giving myself is:

As you share your view of the world don’t consciously try to be clever or unique for the sake of being unique.

So many artists are clamoring to make a name for themselves by doing something that hasn’t been done before. Good luck with that, for the most part. Your work can run the risk of coming across as gimmicky and contrived vs. a natural authenticity. When you share your authentic voice and view of the world, I believe it will stand out.

Let art, like life, happen.

This is another piece of advice that seems to be repeating itself. This is why I like the photo above. At the time of its creation, I was totally focused on something else, and then this composition grabbed me and I knew I had to take the picture and not stand there analyzing it. I was at a wonderful retrospective exhibition of the late, great Helmut Newton in Venice’s Giudecca. I was fully immersed in studying his unique vision and style of execution, when I turned, and here was this view of the world that spoke to me. Enough said.

I hope, in my art, to share my unique view of the world. I hope to trust my gut, more and more, and to allow serendipity and synchronicity to lead my expressions vs. trying to control and over think based on preconceived notions of “good art”.

To see this and other photographs, be sure to visit my online gallery.

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