Being…Just Being.

The art of being, Italywise

Just Being is a recent photo by Jed Smith, taken in Basilicata (the arch of the “foot” of Italy)

In my photography and in my art I’m drawn to subjects who seem to be in a space of being. For me, it’s a representation of stepping out of the rushing stream of doing and needing to accomplish. Probably, this speaks volumes about my own addiction to constant movement and achieving.

Some people might look at the scene above and come to conclusions that reflect some kind of loneliness or sadness. I prefer to believe this man is in a space where the need to do, or to over think life, has dropped away.

Be – don’t try to become. – Osho

Moving to Italy has given me plenty to do, and to accomplish – learning the language, and tackling a pretty big list of logistical imperatives. In other words, I’ve had plenty of food for the hungry monster who thrives on being engaged in constant movement. Also, I’ve realized I don’t have to be physically moving to still be charging forward like a racehorse. I’m well acquainted with my restlessness, lying in bed after waking up in the morning, while my mind latches onto a laundry list of matters that need to be addressed or problems that need to be solved. Chuang Tzu referred to this as “sitting while wandering”. How appropriate.

I’m cheating myself if I remain in the rushing stream of doing. The funny thing is that I KNOW, from experience, when the doing part of me is exhausted, or takes a break, suddenly the world opens up for me. I feel present, and the world expands into dimensions that transcend thought or verbal explanation. In Umbria, I’ve experienced clear nights that wrap me in a magnificent cloak of stars – all made possible by the lack of urban noise and light pollution, and by the lack of thinking about what I have to do tomorrow or what I regret in the road behind me.

As life beckons me to a fuller life, I’ve come to believe that living with paradox is an essential element for my slowing down and residing in being. I’ve not been a fan of paradox for most of my life, because I like to have things figured out and to know where I’m going. That’s pretty ambitious, and I’m learning also, that it’s pretty damn impossible. I’ve thought I’ve needed to constantly steer life, which requires a vigilance that is exhausting. It also doesn’t trust the universe, or a higher power to move and take me to unimagined places. The funny thing is, the most creative and successful solutions to problems come when I quit trying to manhandle my way to figuring things out. The universe will provide answers (maybe not according to our timetable or expectations) if we let go and step into being.

I close with this YouTube video from Alan Watts, which speaks to the paradox of letting go while helping to remind me to let go and reside in “being”.

[pexyoutube pex_attr_src=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Qptyt0-S9U”][/pexyoutube]

 

By |2016-03-16T12:06:07+00:00March 15th, 2016|Color, Reflections on the Journey|6 Comments

About the Author:

I’m an American expat living in Italy!

6 Comments

  1. Anita March 17, 2016 at 4:16 am - Reply

    Ciao Jed…grazie! There are some wonderful things about growing older..Ive learned to let go! Thank you for your beautiful writing &thoughts !! A presto,Anita

    • Jed March 18, 2016 at 9:15 am - Reply

      As always, thanks Anita for writing. Yes, we all make the journey to embracing the aging process and what it can teach us! Baci!

  2. Brent March 15, 2016 at 9:47 pm - Reply

    One of your best! I needed this today after waking at 3 am last night and getting manic about thinking about the future. Thank you!

    • Jed March 16, 2016 at 11:36 am - Reply

      I know the experience so well, my friend. I’m glad this resonated with you. Miss you, Jed

  3. Stephanie Meisel March 15, 2016 at 3:34 pm - Reply

    I hope you paint this too!

    • Jed March 15, 2016 at 5:02 pm - Reply

      You read my mind! Yes, planning another composition of this subject. Stay tuned! xoxox Jed

Leave A Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. By continuing to use this website you consent to our cookie usage and privacy policy. Ok