Benvenuto! If living in Italy is your dream, I’d love to be a resource.

I created Italywise.com to share my journey of living in Italy as an American Expat. For me, moving to Italy required great preparation and diligence, as did navigating the many legalities of becoming an Italian resident. I depended heavily on the advice and experience of others who had already made the journey, so I know the value of resources that can help you build a plan to execute your dream of living in Italy!

My story has multiple parts, and so I have organized this blog accordingly. Some people mistakenly assume, by leaving life in the U.S., I effectively entered retirement. I have an allergic reaction to that word because I am hungry to learn and do. And, living in Italy affords me the opportunity to embrace and develop ALL of my interests. Being an artist and writer is hard-coded into my DNA, so I can’t tell my full-story without sharing my creative journeys as well.

I hope you’ll find ItalyWise intuitive and easy (don’t hesitate to contact me with feedback).

Enjoy the journey!

Jed

Living in Italy

I’ve endeavored to provide valuable information and tips on not only moving to Italy but thoughts on navigating the requirements and legalities of becoming a resident here.  You’ll find tips for buying a house (fairly easy) and buying a car (not so easy), tips for navigating the permesso di soggiorno and residency process, and a host of other necessities of daily life in Italy.

I write about the Italian culture, and hopefully, I can alert you to potential missteps when assuming the “American Way” applies everywhere.

Things to Do in Italy

While the practicalities of being an Italian resident still occupy a good part of my time, I’m not concentrating on exploring Italy and writing about and photography the gems of my discoveries. Hopefully, I’ll share some perspectives that will lead you off the well-worn path.

Starting a New Life

I would be remiss if I told the story of my “new” life in Italy, without sharing the emotional and psychological journey that accompanies starting a new life. I’m learning more about myself, and how life flows.

Art & Photography

While I worked for many years as a creative director, I’ve always nurtured my identity as a fine artist, photographer, and writer. I hope you’ll enjoy seeing my visual expression as a complement to my written accounts of living in Italy.

 

 

Lace Making – Watercolor by Jed

Lace Making - Watercolor by Jed

Lace Making – Watercolor by Jed

As many of you already know, I have been working on a series of smaller watercolors capturing scenes of everyday life in Italy. “Lace Making” is one of my most recent, and captures one of the many women from the island of Burano working outside their homes, and along the canals of the village. You reach Burano via a vaporetto ride from Venice. Unfortunately it is often overlooked and overshadowed by the island of Murano, which attracts hordes of visitors in search Murano glass. Burano is one of the “happiest” places I’ve visited. When the vaporetto pulls into port, you are greeted with a spectacular palette of homes painted in the brightest and most unexpected colors. If you come to Venice, be sure to schedule time to visit this wonderful island. While many people characterize it as a colorful fishing village, it also is a haven of lace-making artisans hard at work – like the woman featured in this watercolor “study”.

For this and other paintings and photography, check out my online gallery.

Buying a House in Italy

 

Buying a house in Italy is easier than you might think. But, the process is quite different from the States.

Buying a house in Italy is easier than you might think. But, the process is quite different from the States.

Looking back at all the things I’ve done in planning and relocating my life, buying a house in Italy was one of the easiest things…surprisingly. In fact, buying a house here is vastly easier than buying a car. Go figure. To buy a car in Italy, you must first be a resident, and that can take some time and patience. To buy a house, you need a codice fiscale (an Italian tax number) and you need to open an Italian bank account – which you can do in a non-resident status. Once you have done those two things, you can pretty much head back to your current home country and handle the remainder of the negotiations and transactions from there –  provided already you’ve found a property that captured your heart, and provided you’ve taken a good, thorough look at the property.

Don’t waste your time trying to figure out why the “system” here makes it fairly easy to buy a house, while making the purchase of a car such an arduous process. Just appreciate that buying a house can go pretty smoothly…provided you take into consideration the following advice.

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Nella Via – In the Street – Painting by Jed

"Nella Via" - "In the Street"

Nella Via – In the Street

As you may know from a previous post, I’m fascinated with snippets of everyday life in the cities and villages in Italy. I enjoy capturing regular people going about their lives. Here is a fellow I saw just out the front door of his home. Yes, he’s in the street, but he strategically has placed his chair to allow passage for at least one car. If I were him, I’d be worried about getting my left foot “clipped”. But, I’m sure the other people in these small villages know the ways and idiosyncrasies of one another, and respond accordingly.

I am enjoying working on these smaller watercolors, and I’ll continue doing so, while also exploring options for a large oil canvas that is waiting patiently for me here in my Umbrian studio.

For this and other paintings and photography, check out my online gallery.

 

Courage, and building a new life.

CourageLeave it to the birth of three kittens to teach me about courage and learning to let life take you on a journey…

Seven days ago it was Sunday afternoon, and our sweet feral cat Micia was crying just outside our front door. Her water had broken and we knew her kittens would be born soon. Just two hours later we heard the faint cries of the hungry newborns coming from the room below our sun room, which houses the water heater, bundles of kindling, and some plastic tarp. I was sure Micia would take good care of her babies. I went to bed that night confident that all would be well when I awoke in the next morning.

The next morning brought distraught cries from Micia. She was waiting for me at the front door, and she quickly moved in the direction of the kittens, looking back to make sure I was following her. When I entered the room housing the kittens, my heart sank. The three kittens were lying on their backs, they were not moving, and their tongues were protruding from their mouths as if they had painfully departed from this world. I picked one up and I felt a cold, stiff body. Micia looked up at me as if to implore me to “do something.” What could have happened in the course of the night?

I was convinced they were dead, so I put them in a basket and began the grim task of finding a proper burial site.

Then, I saw the faintest of movements. They weren’t dead, just on the verge of making that transition. My head was spinning. What could I possibly do? I ran in the house, read about hypothermia and dehydration of newborn kittens on my Ipad. I was going to have to wing it. So, I went back to the tiny room, and I took each kitten and held them individually in my cupped hands, stopping to stroke them and give them whatever comfort and warmth I could. Micia was steadfast, sitting next to me. She was confused. Her eyes never left me, and they conveyed a trust and hope as she watched me.

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La Vedetta – New painting by Jed

La Vedetta - Painting by Jed

La Vedetta

I recently completed a series of smaller watercolors, which included “La Vedetta”, the painting you see here. In Italian “La Vedetta” refers to a person who is always on watch, and in this case probably a person “in the know” as well.

I have long been fascinated with life as seen from and in the windows of Italy. Wherever I go, I see women and men keeping watch from their windows – often times quite openly, and other times quite furtively. After having completed this painting, I have resolved to take my faithful camera and to head out to both the small villages and large cities to capture the many variations on this theme. I believe this is a subject worthy of extensive exploration. I love bringing the psychology of such scenes to my work.

If you’ve spent any significant time in Italy, or if you plan to be in Italy for an extended stay, be prepared to experience the watchful eyes of your neighbors. You may think houses and windows are closed, but people are more keenly aware of your comings and goings than you can imagine. On one hand this is a very good thing since it provides you with a “neighborhood watch” that can put you more at ease. On the other hand, you might want to be mindful to always be on your best behavior as you could be the subject of later conversation and speculation!

For this and other paintings and photography please visit my online gallery.

 

A Study in Orange – Photo by Jed

A Study in Orange

A Study in Orange

I am visually enamored with unexpected color stories, and I’m incredibly grateful when I have the awareness to see a scene like the one above orchestrating itself. Again, this is a life lesson in allowing things to happen, rather than trying to contrive something according to an idea of what I think “might” be interesting.

This photo was taken this past winter while I was in Venice for 2 1/2 days. Two of these days were characterized by high winds, high waters and unrelenting rain. Normally this would be a recipe for ensuring I stay inside and bury my head in a book. Instead, thanks to the urging of Simone, we forged through the elements and I became a periscope for this unique time in Venice. While I was happy to capture a variety of scenes as they presented themselves, I was happiest with this one, which was one of the last images I took as we were on our way to the vaporetto stop to head back to the Santa Lucia train station, and to our Italo train ride back to Rome.

Earlier I had been casting aspersions about the “cheap, makeshift boots” being sold in massive amounts by opportunistic vendors. Little did I know these would become a central part of this photo. I love the orange boots, the orange “legs” of the pigeons, and the orange buildings helping to frame the image.

I’m grateful to the photo for reminding me not to label or judge things according to conditioned expectations of beauty.

Be sure to check out this and other photos and paintings in my online gallery.

Trastevere’s Antica Caciara delivers heavenly, fresh ricotta…and more.

Ricotta di Pecora - fresh sheep's milk ricotta

Ricotta di Pecora – fresh sheep’s milk ricotta

I’m going to gush. Fair warning.

Trastevere’s Antica Caciara is paradise on earth when it comes to gourmet cheese and cured meats. “Caciara” is an Italian word meaning “confusion, bedlam, hubbub, muddle; mess, disorder.” The experience inside this shop is full of energy – energy from customers queueing up to make sure they don’t miss out on the fresh sheep’s milk ricotta prominently displayed in one of the front windows. And, you’d better grab some when you see they have it, because it will definitely make you want to slap someone out of enthusiasm once you taste it. I can’t believe it’s less than five euro a kilo. No wonder it flies out the door.

Antica Caciara is the absolute best place for cheese, prepared meats and baccala.

Antica Caciara is the absolute best place for cheese, prepared meats and baccala.

But, there’s more, loads more – a vast assortment of artisanal cheeses, and every variety of cured meat you could hope for. At one entrance you practically have to shoulder your way past a huge display of guanciale, which is made from pork cheek or jowl, and is an essential ingredient (a preferred cut over traditional pancetta) in Bucatini all’Amatriciana. In case you don’t know, Bucatini all’Amatriciana is one of Rome’s hallmark dishes, originating just outside of the city in the town Amatice in the Sabine Hills.

When I go to Antica Caciara, which is often, I load up on ricotta, a special spicy salame, and a salame with fennel. The people who run the shop couldn’t be more gentile. They recognize me now, and they always greet me warmly. What a great business to be delivering a big slice of culinary paradise to eager customers. If you’re in Rome’s Trastevere neighborhood, be sure to check it out, especially if you want to fill your bag for a gourmet picnic, and then head up the hill to see Bramante’s Tempietto, and one of the most spectacular panoramic views of Rome.

A profuse display of guanciale, an essential ingredient in Bucantini Amatriciana

A profuse display of guanciale, an essential ingredient in Bucantini Amatriciana

Baccala - Another staple in la cucina Romana

Baccala – Another staple in la cucina Romana

Mona Lisa: A Life Discovered by Dianne Hales

Mona Lisa: A Life Discovered by Dianne Hales

Mona Lisa: A Life Discovered by Dianne Hales

Who was she? Author Dianne Hale weaves a fascinating tale to answer this question about, arguably, the most famous painting of all time. Mona Lisa: A Life Discovered is the result of in-depth research into both Leonardo di Vinci and his subject, Lisa Gherardini. Such research included on-the-ground “digging” into antique documents (records and letters) buried in massive files stored in Florence, Italy. Ms. Hale is a woman on a mission. And, that mission is to bring Leonardo’s subject, of whom we know little, into greater focus.

I debated whether to read this book, because I knew once I started reading, I risked wiping away much of the mystery and speculations that we’ve all enjoyed for so many years about the Mona Lisa and her enigmatic smile. But, I like historical detective work, so I decided to proceed.

I found Mona Lisa: A Life Discovered to be an engaging read, but not for the reasons I had anticipated. In seeking to piece together the chain of events leading to the painting of the Mona Lisa, and its “travels” after completion, Ms. Hale paints a vivid picture of life in Italy during the Renaissance – particularly in Florence. I love following a mystery while gaining greater historical context in the process. I learned more about Leonardo di Vinci. Enough details exist about him to allow the reader to sense his personality, his willfulness, his brilliance, and his capriciousness in flitting from one project to another while leaving unfulfilled promises and works in his wake. Lisa Gherardini, is a different story, however. While Ms. Hale has amassed admirable historical details of her life and her subsequent marriage to Francesco del Giocondo, a silk and cloth merchant, little exists to create any sense of her personality. Here Ms. Hale must stick to conjecture and supposition – lots of “What if?” Perhaps this is the unfortunate by-product of women having second-class status, and less attention being given to a housewife and mother in the chronicles of history.

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Venturing into Oils

Kindness - New Oil Painting by Jed

Kindness – Jed’s first oil painting.

After years and years of painting solely with watercolors, I have completed my first oil painting. Whew. My perfectionism characteristics had been setting me up for possible failure, but the better part of me reminded me that this was the first step in learning, and even failure can lead to development of  style and technique. I guess there are lots of life lessons in that as well. If I only proceed with the assurance of success, or of a predetermined outcome, the borders of my universe are going to be fairly narrow and confining.

Many people have asked why I would I dive into the world of oil painting when I have achieved pretty good success with watercolor. The simple answer is “scale”. I’ve been wanting to expand my scale of expression. Watercolors seem to be more limiting in this regards – not only from the size of the materials, l.e. watercolor paper, but the medium itself. Watercolors can have a life of their own, and painting with them is often a race against the clock.

How nice it has been to work on a larger “canvas” and with paints that dry slowly and allow me to work in greater subtleties and detail. The flip side of that is that working in oil has required great patience on my part, since the paint dries much more slowly. Another life lesson there – the process of building, of taking one step at a time, and then trusting in the end result.

I’ve titled this painting “Kindness” because that is the overwhelming sense I get when looking at this man. I remember meeting him on the island of Tinos, in Greece, several years ago, and he was peddling his homemade wine. Those of you who know me and my work, know that I have a love affair with older faces and the unique map of lines etched in them. These lines convey so much, particularly in regards to a person’s history and their character.

Now I am taking a breather, as I begin packing my art supplies for the move back to Umbria for most of the spring and summer. My next canvas will be even larger, and I am contemplating my next subject matter. I’ll let you know what I choose, and how my next oil painting is progressing.

For this and other paintings and photography, please be sure to visit my online gallery.

 

 

Un’ottima scuola di Italiano: Torre di Babele Roma

If you're serious about learning to speak Italian properly, this is the school in Rome for you.

If you’re serious about learning to speak Italian properly, this is the school in Rome for you.

I recently completed a four-week intensive Italian language course at Torre di Babele Roma. At the conclusion of my last class my brain was beyond saturated with the complexities of Italian grammar, but I could not have been happier with the experience. And, I could not have been in more capable and more loving hands. This school is a class act in every regard.

I researched and visited another prominent Italian language school in Rome prior to choosing Torre di Babele, but I just wasn’t “feeling the love”. I’m sure the other school is capable, but I needed an environment where I would not feel stressed. I’m a serious student, but learning, for me, is most fruitful when the teaching includes smiles and patience. Thankfully, I took the trip to visit Torre di Babele, and found plenty of these traits.

The school is located in a lovely residential neighborhood, just a short walk from the Policlinico metro stop. Elegant wrought iron gates greet you, and the building looks like a stately home, nestled amongst lush greenery.

When I first visited the school I met with the director and she made time to sit with me and find out what I was looking for in a school and what I wanted to do with my Italian studies. She was also getting a sense of my aptitude and level of speaking Italian. She asked me if I had time to take a 20-minute test to assess my skills. I guess my years of doing Rosetta Stone paid off, and I was placed in the Level 4 class – that’s like a beginning intermediate level. Even then, I was advised to study conditional verb tenses in preparation for the class.

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